Cleaning and culling

Cleaning and culling

Neglecting to keep on top of the more routine housekeeping routines has consequences. There is physical and mental clutter that has piled up while I was studying, with the best of intentions to read or deal with it later when I was done. Well I’m done now and this week I started confronting the various piles of “stuff” to free me up for other things.

On the list is an image cull which was something I had previously done to recoup some space on my hard drive but now is focused on being more selective about what I want to hold on to. I also decided to challenge the notion that a photographer can never have too many camera bags, finally putting 2 of my old LowePro bags out for collection.

The main task was finding a place to put away the darkroom gear and during that task I discovered a hidden cache of tools in a drawer I had not opened for 5 years. These were favourites for small jobs so it was a fond reunion. Thinking about that I wondered if there were images lurking about that would evoke similar feelings. To reinforce that another discovery was a collection of Kodachromes slides from my trip to Japan over 30 years ago. I know I have negatives and prints going back decades and perhaps it is time to invest a film scanner so I can start working through them.

At least I am getting my cobwebs under control…

An unexpected reunion

An unexpected reunion

The process of helping tidy up my parents house sparked one project around the worn down tools I found there but it also may have led me back to my roots from a photographic perspective.

You see, a small bungalow at the back of the house had become a free family storage facility, particularly for my nieces, many of whom are have only just started settling down. Among the various old furniture and other items were several boxes of darkroom equipment and an enlarger, most of which I had bought 30 years ago when I started out. I had given them to one of the nieces when she took up photography but she has no time now and they wound up being stored.

So those boxes came home, the contents were carefully inspected and the trays and other wet gear cleaned. While doing that I made another discovery. The room I was using for this task did not exist when I first moved in. It was a bathroom but got converted to a washroom for my Wife’s ceramics studio (a story for another time). It has two very large sinks, an exhaust fan and no windows, making it almost the perfect darkroom.

This combination of discoveries opens up the possibility of more hands on printmaking once a few small hurdles are overcome. As my studies come to an end soon, there will be the time to invest in this as a project. It has certainly given me something to think about as the current project comes to a close next week.